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Friday, January 06, 2017

A Little Snow

A little snow goes a long way in Albuquerque. We got about a half inch last night. This morning, university offices and all the public schools closed for the day.





Most of my spare time lately has been devoted to getting my plate camera ready to make pictures.  When I've taken a break from that project and gone for a walk around the neighborhood, I've carried along my little Olympus 35rc.  It is a marvelous little rangefinder designed by the incomparable Maitani.


7 comments:

Jim Grey said...

I like the tire tracks shot. I've thought many times about making one similar to it. We certainly have plenty of opportunity in Indiana, but we seldom get so little snow that tire tracks break through to asphalt below!

JR Smith said...

I have not used the Olympus rangefinders, but given how much I love the Maitani-designed Olympus OM-2, I should give one of these a try!

I recall flying into Albuquerque on business once from Phoenix Sky Harbor and seeing snow along the runway at Sunport.

Mike said...

I've never been disappointed with the results from any of my Olympus cameras. My first was a little Pen EEs half frame which was the only camera I can think of off hand that I bought new. Recently, I picked up an mju for a buck at a thrift store that I hope to show off soon in a blog post.

astrobeck said...

Nice shots Mike.
That little rc Olympus is a sweet shooter.
The carosel is my favorite. Is that at the zoo? It's perfect.

Angela said...

The tracks is my favourite too - beautiful. I only heard about Rangefinder's a few years ago but I still don't fully understand them. Every time I see photos taken with them - I look for the definition I read it, it kind of makes sense and then I forget it again. It just won't stick in my brain :-)

Mike said...

The carousel is at the zoo. It occupies a space near the cafe that was formerly devoted to camel rides. Kind of sad to see that change in a way, but at least the carousel animals don't bite and spit at you.

Mike said...

The idea of a manual rangefinder is pretty far in photography's past at this point. It was just a little optical aid to focusing which allowed more precision than guesstimating distances. Like many tech features, it is one of those things much easier demonstrated than explained.